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We Ship Nationwide!
Prices subject to change at the 
discretion of AAB Texas without notice
In addition to helium  rental & sales, we carry a 
wide variety of latex and foil balloons,
floral supplies, promotional products, school spirit items
 and entertainer supplies! 

If you live in the Dallas Ft. Worth area,
 come visit our huge showroom at 
2406 E. Randol Mill Rd. Arlington, TX 76011
 M-F 9:00am - 5:00pm Saturday 9:00am - 12:30pm

FAQ's Section


* Q. Do I have to place my order online… I’m concerned about Internet fraud? If you would prefer, you may place your order via fax (817-274-9715) or by phoning our Customer Service office at 1-800-334-5128. The Customer Service phone lines are open Monday through Friday from 9:00am to 5:00pm CST and Saturday from 9:00am to 12:30pm CST. Please have your complete order and credit card information ready at the time of your order.

* Q. If you are out of stock on an item, will you make a substitution? We do not make substitutions unless you specifically request it. We also do not generate backorders. We will call you to let you know of any shortages so that you may substitute or change your order.

* Q. Are your balloons blown up when I receive them?  All balloons – latex and foils – are shipped flat due to shipping requirements. Most balloons would not “survive” the shipping process if preinflated with helium. The exception to this would be the 4” & 9” air filled foil balloons.

* Q. OK, so they are not blown up… where do I get them inflated?  If you do not have access to a helium tank, we suggest that you check with your local grocery store, florist or party store. Most will inflate your balloons for a fee.

* Q. How long does it take to receive my balloon order? This depends on your location in relation to ours. Our FOB is Arlington, Texas 76011. We ship ground UPS on all orders unless otherwise requested by you when you place your order. You can go to the UPS website and it will tell you the estimated date of delivery. Remember, if you place your order after 2:00pm CST your order will ship the next business day.

* Q, How much does shipping cost?  This depends on the weight of the package(s), your location and the shipping option (UPS ground/next day/2nd day/3rd day). 

* Q, What is your return policy?  There is a 25% restocking fee for all returned merchandise.
  

Balloons and Our Environment:

There are two types of balloons: latex and foil. Latex balloons are 100% biodegradable, made from the sap of rubber trees. Latex balloons biodegrade in about the same time as an oak leaf. Latex balloons are the only balloons used in balloon releases.

Latex balloon releases conducted by professional balloon artists are not harmful to the environment. Biodegradable latex balloons are used exclusively by professionals and these balloons are released without strings, clips, discs, ribbons or any objects attached. Without the added weight of these items, latex balloons rise high into the atmosphere where 90% of them brittle facture. These balloons fall harmlessly back to earth in tiny shattered fragments.

Professional balloon artists attach weights to all helium balloons not intended for release. This prevents any balloons from becoming strays.

Never release a foil balloon.

Balloon clips and discs should be avoided if balloons are intended for children under the age of 6.

Helium cylinder safety precautions:

Read, understand and observe the safety precautions on the cylinder neck label and the warning label on the side of the cylinder.

Helium is non-flammable, odorless, colorless and will not explode or burn.

It is the inflation medium used with floating balloons and is perfectly safe to use with balloons.

Cylinders must be secured to a wall or placed in a safety stand at all times. Store and use helium cylinders in a well ventilated area. Keep in an upright, secure position so they cannot be knocked over.

Close the cylinder valve after each use and when cylinder is empty.

If a cylinder must be moved, close cylinder valve, remove inflator, replace cylinder cap and use a cylinder cart to move cylinders.

NEVER breathe or allow anyone to breathe helium from cylinders of filed balloons. Asphyxiation or serious lung damage could occur.

Never use any balloon regulator, cylinder or valve fitting that is damaged, leaking or malfunctioning. Have product repaired or replaced at once.

Do not store cylinder in direct sunlight or apply heat above 120°F.

Equipment and Accessories:

Regulators:There are several types of regulators with varying types of functions and features. It is up to you and your budget to choose the best for your business. Here is a sample of regulator types available:

Economy regulator – has a rubber tip nozzle which works well for latex balloons. You may also inflate foil balloons with this nozzle but you must use extra care since you regulate the follow of helium into the balloon. You must be sure not to over inflate or you risk bursting the self sealing valve or popping the balloon.

Economy regulator with pressure gauge – has a rubber tip nozzle as well as a pressure gauge. This will allow you to know when your helium tank is running low on helium.

Foil tip – is used with the rubber tip nozzle of the economy regulator. It is a thinner tip made to make inflation of foil balloons much easier than using the wider rubber tip. It inserts into the end of the rubber tip of the regulator.

Double ended regulator – is designed to inflate both latex and foil balloons. One tip is the rubber nozzle for latex balloons and the other tip is the foil tip used to inflate the foil balloons. This design has an automatic shut off valve so that it regulates the flow of helium into the foil balloon and shuts off automatically once the balloon is full. This regulator also has a pressure gauge so that you will know how much helium is in the tank. Many styles also have a ribbon cutter attached as well.

Air Inflators:These are used to fill balloons not intended to float. There are two basic types – electric and hand held. The electric model is used to inflate several larger balloons at a time, such as when building columns. The hand held inflators are used for smaller balloons, such as 5” latex/foils or entertainer latex (260s).

Heat Sealer:This piece of equipment is used to sell foil balloons which are not self sealing. Most of these are the 4” & 9” foils. These balloons are first filled with air and then sealed shut with the heat sealer.

To properly use the machine, follow these steps…

Inflate the balloon until it is very firm, but not hard.

Place the stem of the balloon across the heat sealer being careful the stem is flat and wrinkle-free.

Twist the balloon at the neck and then place on a cup and stick.

Cups:For air filled balloons used in décor such as centerpieces. A cup is used to support the balloon. Different sizes and styles exist depending on the size and style of the balloons.

Sticks:These are inserted into the neck of the cup. They are available in variety of sizes and colors depending on the size of the cup. Not all cups and sticks are interchangeable. Make sure you have the correct stick to fit the cup you are using.

Care and Handling of your latex balloons:

StorageStore in a cool, dry place out of direct light. Exposure of uninflated balloons to air and light causes them to become brittle and discolored. Balloons exposed to these conditions may break when inflated. Balloons should be at room temperature (70°) before inflating.

Proper Inflation with air or helium:

For outdoor use in warm weather – over inflate, and then let some of the air/helium out of the balloons before closing with a tie or sealing device. This stretches the latex and allows the air/helium to expand in the heat when either taking outdoors or inflating outdoors.

For outdoor use in cool weather – If the balloons are inflated indoors and taken outside when it is cool, the balloons will shrink in size and not float as long. If the balloons are inflated outdoors, for use outdoors, the balloons should be inflated slowly to full and proper inflation. They will not stay up as long as balloons used indoors.

Latex balloon appearance: Balloons will form a white frosty finish from exposure to light and humid air (ozone). Standard and pearlized balloons look best for extended exposure to these conditions because their opaque finish disguises this frosty look.

Float time for helium filled balloons: Float time is affected by the conditions of the room. Balloons used in humid and outdoor conditions will last the shortest amount of time. Approximate float times are for Standard, Crystal and Decorator colors. Pearlized balloons do not float as long. Balloons sealed with a valve or clip do not float as long as hand tied balloons because of the added weight.

9” – 8 to 16 hours
11” – 12 to 22 hours
14” – 26 to 40 hours
16” & 17” – 32 to 51 hours

What causes balloons to break?
1) Over inflating
2) Static electricity
3) Expansion in hot, outdoor conditions
4) Extreme temperature changes
5) Inserting onto inflator nozzle improperly
6) Contact with sharp objects!

Tips for working with balloons:

The shape of the balloon should be round to slightly pear-shape. Ribbons are prettier than string. Make sure balloons and ribbons are color coordinated.

Eleven (11) inch is the preferred balloon size for bouquets. Nine (9) inch are used for air sculpture work. Sixteen (16) inch are used to make a greater impact.

Professionals use templates or automatic sizers to make sure each balloon is the same size, especially for columns, arches and sculpture work.

Most professional decorators hand tie latex balloons. Most foil balloons 18” and larger have a self sealing valve.

Common decorating mistakes

Overblown balloons – Prestretch the latex using an air inflator. This is especially helpful when using pearlized latex.

Stubby ribbon tails – Curling the tails (and even the necks if left long) adds a “finished” look to your bouquet. Always try to curl along the natural curve of the ribbon.

Weight-less balloons – This occurs if balloons are under inflated (an 11” inflated to a 7”) or too much Hi-Float is used.

Mal-sized balloons – Keeping balloons the same size gives your columns and bouquets a consistent look throughout your design.

Poor color combinations – To ensure that you meet your customer’s color choices, show them inflated latex samples and tape a piece of the ribbon color to your decorating worksheet.

Making a template:

Sizing balloons is an important skill to learn in order to present a professional finished product. You may choose to invest in automatic sizers or premade templates. But if you are just starting out a template can be as simple as cutting holes in a cardboard box.

1) Make or buy an open box made out of particle board, cardboard, plywood or plexiglass.
2) Make a template frame. These are flat squares of board, plexiglass, foam core or heavy cardboard that covers the top of the open box, extending about one inch on all sides.
3) Using a compass, trace circles of different sizes on the template frames. You may want to make your smallest circle at 3” and proceed in 1” inch increments up to 16”.
4) Cut out the circles you have drawn. This should leave an open circle to use as your template frames which you will use to size your latex balloons.Be sure to smooth your edges to avoid popping the latex.
5) To use the template box, inflate a balloon and pinch the neck closed. Place the balloon upside down over the desired size template opening. Allow the balloon to deflate until the balloon center fits the template opening.

Preparing helium bouquets for delivery: A common mistake made during a helium delivery is arriving at the delivery location with a bunch of tangled balloons. Here are some tips to help you arrive with a beautiful bouquet.

1) The most important step is to be sure that all of the balloons are tightly nestled evenly together in the bouquet. Gather all the ribbons of the balloons in your hand. Pull the ribbons until the base of all the balloons rest on or very near your hand – the balloons should be snug in the bunch – so snug that they cannot move.
2) Put a tight temporary clip or twist tie onto the middle of the bunch. A Velcro clip or Quickie clip works well.
3) Some balloon artist put the bouquets in large delivery bags. This will also help reduce oxidation.
4) Do not remove the bag or temporary clip until you are inside the building where you are delivering to bouquet.

Another “tangle free” suggestion is the following technique for assembling the bouquet:
1) Inflate one 11” latex balloon and tie to a single ribbon.
2) Inflate three balloons and tie to individual ribbons.
3) Group the three balloons together and pull your hand up the ribbons until your hand reaches the necks of the balloons. Position this cluster under the single balloon and ribbon so that the four balloons fit snugly together. Tie a knot with all four ribbons to hold this cluster together.
4) Position another group of three balloons with ribbons snuggly against the first group. Tie another knot to attach all seven balloons together. Continue adding and tying on clusters of three until the bouquet is of the desired size.

A note about Hi-Float:

Hi-Float is an aqueous solution containing a special water soluble plastic. It dries inside the latex balloon to form a barrier coating which helps hold in helium. This coating greatly increases the floating life of the balloon.

Hi-Float is non-toxic, non-irritating, non-corrosive, non-flammable and biodegradable. It is very similar to the adhesive found on the back of postage stamps. Wash off the skin with water. If accidentally splashed into the eyes, flush with water for several minutes.

When used properly, Ultra Hi-Float will increase the floating life of latex balloons on average about twenty-five times.

Use only enough to coat the inside of the latex balloon – about the size of a pea. If you put in too much Hi-Float it will add weight to the balloon and will cause it not to float.

Additional questions? Please email us at order@allamericanballoons.net

* More Questions?  Refer to out Terms and Conditions listed under the registration site. Also, check out our Facts and Tips for decorating ideas. Or feel free to contact our Customer Service department Monday through Friday 8:30am to 5:00pm CST and Saturday 9:00am to 12:30pm CST. You may also email us at order@allamericanballoons.net 

Smart Balloon Icon

Smart Balloon Practices

You can carry out smart balloon practices by following these tips.

Keep balloons secured to a weight.  All helium-filled balloons should be tied securely to a weight that will keep them from releasing into the air; be sure to individually tie each balloon to the weight, so if they become detached from the weight, they will be individual rather than “clustered” (tied together) balloons which can more easily become entangled in power lines.

Do not release foil balloons into the air.  Although it is very rare, they can cause problems if they are tangled in power lines and can turn into roadside litter if not disposed of properly. 

Keep deflate d or popped latex balloons away from small children to avoid risks of choking.  Children can choke or suffocate on uninflated or broken balloons; adults should always supervise young children (especially those under 8 years-old) with balloons.

Although it rarely occurs, some people are known to have a “latex allergy.” Talk to your customers to find out if this pertains to them or the person to whom they will be giving the balloons and educate them about how they can still purchase balloons and not be affected. Latex balloons are made of natural rubber latex and are biodegradable, but may cause allergic reactions in people who are allergic to natural rubber latex.

Weight photo A

By tying the ribbons directly onto the weight, this will ensure that if the ribbons come loose or get cut they will disperse separately and have less of a chance getting tangled in power lines.

Weight Photo B

Do not tie ribbons in a knot and then tie to the weight. This will keep the ribbons and balloons clustered together, making it more likely to get tangled in power lines.

 

TBC
Smart Balloon Practices is an educational program of The Balloon Council.

Balloons and Our Environment:

There are two types of balloons: latex and foil. Latex balloons are 100% biodegradable, made from the sap of rubber trees. Latex balloons biodegrade in about the same time as an oak leaf. Latex balloons are the only balloons used in balloon releases.

Latex balloon releases conducted by professional balloon artist are not harmful to the environment. Biodegradable latex balloons are used exclusively by professionals and these balloons are released without strings, clips, disc, ribbons or any objects attached. Without the added weight of these items, latex balloons rise high into the atmosphere where 90% of them brittle facture. These balloons fall harmlessly back to earth in tiny shattered fragments.

Professional balloon artist attach weights to all helium balloons not intended for release. This prevents any balloons from becoming strays.

Never release a foil balloon.

Balloon clips and discs should be avoided if balloons are intended for children under the age of 6.

Helium cylinder safety precautions:

Read, understand and observe the safety precautions on the cylinder neck label and the warning label on the side of the cylinder.

Helium is non-flammable, odorless, colorless and will not explode or burn.

It is the inflation medium used with floating balloons and is perfectly safe to use with balloons.

Cylinders must be secured to a wall or placed in a safety stand at all times. Store and use helium cylinders in a well ventilated area. Keep in an upright, secure position so they cannot be knocked over.

Close the cylinder valve after each use and when cylinder is empty.

If a cylinder must be moved, close cylinder valve, remove inflator, replace cylinder cap and use a cylinder cart to move cylinders.

NEVER breathe or allow anyone to breathe helium from cylinders of filed balloons. Asphyxiation or serious lung damage could occur.

Never use any balloon regulator, cylinder or valve fitting that is damaged, leaking or malfunctioning. Have product repaired or replaced at once.

Do not store cylinder in direct sunlight or apply heat above 120°F.

Equipment and Accessories:

Regulators:There are several types of regulators with varying types of functions and features. It is up to you and your budget to choose the best for your business. Here is a sample of regulator types available:

Economy regulator – has a rubber tip nozzle which works well for latex balloons. You may also inflate foil balloons with this nozzle but you must use extra care since you regulate the follow of helium into the balloon. You must be sure not to over inflate or you risk bursting the self sealing valve or popping the balloon.

Economy regulator with pressure gauge – has a rubber tip nozzle as well as a pressure gauge. This will allow you to know when your helium tank is running low on helium.

Mylar tip – is used with the rubber tip nozzle of the economy regulator. It is a thinner tip made to make inflation of foil balloons much easier than using the wider rubber tip. It inserts into the end of the rubber tip of the regulator.

Double ended regulator – is designed to inflate both latex and foil balloons. One tip is the rubber nozzle for latex balloons and the other tip is the mylar tip used to inflate the foil balloons. This design has an automatic shut off valve so that it regulates the flow of helium into the foil balloon and shuts off automatically once the balloon is full. This regulator also has a pressure gauge so that you will know how much helium is in the tank. Many styles also have a ribbon cutter attached as well.

Air Inflators:These are used to fill balloons not intended to float. There are two basic types – electric and hand held. The electric model is used to inflate several larger balloons at a time, such as when building columns. The hand held inflators are used for smaller balloons, such as 5” latex/foils or entertainer latex (260s).

Heat Sealer:This piece of equipment is used to sell foil balloons which are not self sealing. Most of these are the 4”/5”/9” foils. These balloons are first filled with air and then sealed shut with the heat sealer.

To properly use the machine, follow these steps…

Inflate the balloon until it is very firm, but not hard.

Place the stem of the balloon across the heat sealer being careful the stem is flat and wrinkle-free.

Twist the balloon at the neck and then place on a cup and stick.

Cups:For air filled balloons used in décor such as centerpieces. A cup is used to support the balloon. Different sizes and styles exist depending on the size and style of the balloons.

Sticks:These are inserted into the neck of the cup. They are available in variety of sizes and colors depending on the size of the cup. Not all cups and sticks are interchangeable. Make sure you have the correct stick to fit the cup you are using.

Care and Handling of your latex balloons:

Storage:Store in a cool, dry place out of direct light. Exposure of uninflated balloons to air and light causes them to become brittle and discolored. Balloons exposed to these conditions may break when inflated. Balloons should be at room temperature (70°) before inflating.

Proper Inflation with air or helium:

For outdoor use in warm weather – Over inflate, and then let some of the air/helium out of the balloons before closing with a tie or sealing devise. This stretches the latex and allows the air/helium to expand in the heat when either taking outdoors or inflating outdoors.

For outdoor use in cool weather – It the balloons are inflated indoors and taken outside when it is cool, the balloons will shrink in size and not float as long. If the balloons are inflated outdoors, for use outdoors, the balloons should be inflated slowly to full and proper inflation. They will not stay up as long as balloons used indoors.

Latex balloon appearance:Balloons will form a white frosty finish from exposure to light and humid air (ozone). Standard and pearlized balloons look best for extended exposure to these conditions because their opaque finish disguises this frosty look.

Float time for helium filled balloons:Float time is affected by the conditions of the room. Balloons used in humid and outdoor conditions will last the shortest amount of time. Approximate float times are for Standard, Crystal and Decorator colors. Pearlized balloons do not float as long. Balloons sealed with a valve or clip do not float as long as hand tied balloons because of the added weight.

9” – 8 to 16 hours
11” – 12 to 22 hours
14” – 26 to 40 hours
16”/17” – 32 to 51 hours

What causes balloons to break?
1) Over inflating
2) Static electricity
3) Expansion in hot, outdoor conditions
4) Extreme temperature changes
5) Inserting onto inflator nozzle improperly
6) Contact with sharp objects!

Tips for working with balloons:

The shape of the balloon should be round to slightly pear-shape. Ribbons are prettier than string. Make sure balloons and ribbons are color coordinated.

Eleven (11) inch is the preferred balloon size for bouquets. Nine (9) inch are used for air sculpture work. Sixteen (16) inch are used to make a “great” impact.

Professionals use templates or automatic sizers to make sure each balloon is the same size, especially for columns, arches and sculpture work.

Most professional decorators hand tie latex balloons. Most foil balloons 18” and larger have a self sealing valve.

Common decorating mistakes

Overblown balloons – Prestretch the latex using an air inflator. This is especially helpful when using pearlized latex.

Stubby ribbon tails – Curling the tails (and even the necks if left long) adds a “finished” look to your bouquet. Always try to curl along the natural curve of the ribbon.

Weight-less balloons – This occurs if balloons are under inflated (an 11” inflated to a 7”) or too much Hi-Float is used.

Mal-sized balloons – Keeping balloons the same size gives your columns and bouquets a consistent look throughout your design.

Poor color combinations – To ensure that you meet your customer’s color choices, show them inflated latex samples and tape a piece of the ribbon color to your decorating worksheet.

Making a template:

Sizing balloons is an important skill to learn in order to present a professional finished product. You may choose to invest in automatic sizers or premade templates. But if you are just starting out a template can be as simple as cutting holes in a cardboard box.

1) Make or buy an open box made out of particle board, cardboard, plywood or plexiglass.
2) Make a template frame. These are flat squares of board, plexiglass, foam core or heavy cardboard that covers the top of the open box, extending about one inch on all sides.
3) Using a compass, trace circles of different sizes on the template frames. You may want to make your smallest circle at 3” and proceed in 1” inch increments up to 16”.
4) Cut out the circles you have drawn. This should leave an open circle to use as your template frames which you will use to size your latex balloons.Be sure to smooth your edges to avoid popping the latex.
5) To use the template box, inflate a balloon and pinch the neck closed. Place the balloon upside down over the desired size template opening. Allow the balloon to deflate until the balloon center fits the template opening.

Preparing helium bouquets for delivery:A common mistake made during a helium delivery is arriving at the delivery location with a bunch of tangled balloons. Here are some tips to help you arrive with a beautiful bouquet.

1) The most important step is to be sure that all of the balloons are tightly nestled evenly together in the bouquet. Gather all the ribbons of the balloons in your hand. Pull the ribbons until the base of all the balloons rest on or very near your hand – the balloons should be snug in the bunch – so snug that they cannot move.
2) Put a tight temporary clip or twist tie onto the middle of the bunch. A Velcro clip or Quickie clip works well.
3) Some balloon artist put the bouquets in large delivery bags. This will also help reduce oxidation.
4) Do not remove the bag or temporary clip until you are inside the building where you are delivering to bouquet.

Another “tangle free” suggestion is the following technique for assembling the bouquet:
1) Inflate one 11” latex balloon and tie to a single ribbon.
2) Inflate three balloons and tie to individual ribbons.
3) Group the three balloons together and pull your hand up the ribbons until your hand reaches the necks of the balloons. Position this cluster under the single balloon and ribbon so that the four balloons fit snugly together. Tie a knot with all four ribbons to hold this cluster together.
4) Position another group of three balloons with ribbons snuggly against the first group. Tie another knot to attach all seven balloons together. Continue adding and tying on clusters of three until the bouquet is of the desired size.

A note about Hi-Float:

Hi-Float is an aqueous solution containing a special water soluble plastic. It dries inside the latex balloon to form a barrier coating which helps hold in helium. This coating greatly increases the floating life of the balloon.

Hi-Float is non-toxic, non-irritating, non-corrosive, non-flammable and biodegradable. It is very similar to the adhesive found on the back of postage stamps. Wash off the skin with water. If accidentally splashed into the eyes, flush with water for several minutes.

When used properly, Ultra Hi-Float will increase the floating life of latex balloons on average about twenty-five times.

Use only enough to coat the inside of the latex balloon – about the size of a pea. If you put in too much Hi-Float it will add weight to the balloon and will cause it not to float.

Additional questions? Please email us at order@allamericanballoons.net